2011 Taiwan Kansai 2 Japan

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(1) 「時代祭」Jidai Matsuri

Jidai Matsuri is one of three major festivals in Kyoto. The festival (a procession) was part historical event reenactment and part costume show from various historical periods. The procession marched on a public road for approx 4.5km / 2.8miles (the route was pre-defined).
The festival was originally scheduled for the previous day but was postponed due to heavy rain. I was lucky to have a chance to experience this event.
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The banner said "ever-new old ancient city, toward 1300 year anniversary". Unlike other ancient cities in Japan, Kyoto has been eagerly assimilating new things and made them part of it.
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The costumes were carefully re-created based on the latest research. I was disappointed, however, that people in costume wore today's eye-glasses, rather than eye-glasses that might have been available for that historical period. At least, they should use contact-lenses, I think.
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(2) Traditional Japanese study room

A study room used by a famous Japanese female poet, 与謝野晶子 ([Yosano]).
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(3)「大原」Ohara

Although Cosmos is not native to Japan, Cosmos is often associated with Japanese landscape in autumn.
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三千院 (Sanzen-in)
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Lumbers harvested in Ohara and other surrounding cities of Kyoto are almost perfectly round and straight. This was due to many hundreds of years of human selection.
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(4) Kurama Temple

The main hall of the temple was 160m / 525ft higher than the entrance to the religious compound. The view from there was gorgeous and refreshing thanks to the nice weather. This temple and its mountain is a popular hiking destination in Kyoto.
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People worshiping in a shrine
The way people worship a god in Japan was quite different from the way people do in Taiwan.
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